Kindersley Pass / Sinclair Creek Loop

Radium Hot Springs, British Columbia

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1 Review
5 out of 5
This hike features fabulous views of area mountains, including Devil’s Tooth, Mount Sinclair, and Mount Kindersley. You may not develop buns of steel on the climb to Kindersley –Sinclair Pass (2,395 m), but this hike is no easy walk in the woods. While the initial part of the trail is heavily wooded, primarily by Douglas fir, it’s also a flower-lover’s paradise, especially after 2.2 kilometers where an avalanche chute opens up the trail. Even if you’re not interested in flowers, you can’t help but enjoy the kaleidoscope of brightly colored fleabane, wild roses, Indian paintbrush, yellow columbine, cow parsnip, fireweed, and blue clematis. If you’re really lucky or unlucky, depending on how you look at it, you may also spot an occasional grizzly bear scrounging for food along nearby avalanche chutes. Apparently there’s a female grizzly with cubs who lives near this trail, but she’s avoided encounters with hikers.
Hiking Yoho, Kootenay, Glacier, and Mt. Revelstoke National Parks

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Hiking Yoho, Kootenay, Glacier, and Mt. Revelstoke National Parks

by Michelle Gurney & Kathy Howe (Falcon Guides)

This hike features fabulous views of area mountains, including Devil’s Tooth, Mount Sinclair, and Mount Kindersley. You may not develop buns of steel on the climb to Kindersley –Sinclair Pass (2,395 m), but this hike is no easy walk in the woods. While the initial part of the trail is heavily wooded, primarily by Douglas fir, it’s also a flower-lover’s paradise, especially after 2.2 kilometers where an avalanche chute opens up the trail.

Even if you’re not interested in flowers, you can’t help but enjoy the kaleidoscope of brightly colored fleabane, wild roses, Indian paintbrush, yellow columbine, cow parsnip, fireweed, and blue clematis. If you’re really lucky or unlucky, depending on how you look at it, you may also spot an occasional grizzly bear scrounging for food along nearby avalanche chutes. Apparently there’s a female grizzly with cubs who lives near this trail, but she’s avoided encounters with hikers.

©  Michelle Gurney & Kathy Howe/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Radium Hot Springs
Distance: 10.1
Elevation Gain: 3,461 feet
Trail Type: Shuttle
Skill Level: Moderate
Duration: 4 to 5 hours
Season: Best mid-June to mid-September
Trailhead Elevation: 4,396 feet
Top Elevation: 7,841 feet
Local Contacts: Kootenay National Park
Local Maps: Kootenay National Park (GemTrek Publishing); Tangle Peak, 82 J/12
Driving Directions: Directions to Kindersley Pass / Sinclair Creek Loop

Recent Trail Reviews

9/8/2008
1

This is a great hike. My wife and I hiked the loop in about 6 and a half hours. The hike starts at the trail head for Kindersley Pass trail on highway 93 then steadily gains elevation through many switch back. This trail is easy to follow and despite the large amount of elevation gain is a pretty easy hike. The views of the surrounding mountains are well worth the effort once you have reached an open area or cleared the tree line. Once you reach the col, there are several short side trips that you can take to the tops of several nearby peaks and ridges. The trail then drops quickly down to the valley floor and follows Sinclair creek back down to the highway. The trail both up and down was a bit muddy and quite slick. Slimy might be a better word, especially on the hike down. You could hike this loop in either direction but I would recommend going up on Kindersley Pass trail and down on the Sinclair Creek trail because the Sinclair Creek trail is quite steep. I would rather hike down it than up. There is a very large and active wildlife population in Kootenay Park which was evident by the deer tracks that followed this trail almost from start to finish. Also following this trail from start to finish were a fresh set of black bear tracks. I was amazed that the bear followed the trail up to the col and then back down again almost exactly as the guide book describes it. Just before reaching the col we spotted 7 deer up on a ridge, 2 bucks and 5 does. We did not however spot the bear. The Sinclair Creek Trail does not let you out at the parking lot you started out or even at the high way. It leaves you at a small, no longer used paved section of forest road. Walk this road a short distance south and you will find the highway, another short distance south and you will find your car. All in all this was a excellent hike with gorgeous views and a nice trail to follow. We were a bit tired by the time we finished the whole hike, but it is well worth it if you have the time.



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May 2018