Lake Oesa

Golden, British Columbia

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2 Reviews
5 out of 5
A moderate, rocky climb from Lake O’Hara past Yukness Lake, Lake Victoria, and Lefroy Lake before meeting Lake Oesa. Stunning scenery. Like many of the other trails in the Lake O’Hara area, you won’t be disappointed by mediocre scenery. If you delight in visiting alpine lakes, you’ll really enjoy this trip. Like many of the other trails in the Lake O’Hara area, you won’t be disappointed by mediocre scenery. If you delight in visiting alpine lakes, you’ll really enjoy this trip. Start the trail at Sargent’s Point directly across the fire road (east) of the Le Relais day-use shelter. From here you’ll also have fabulous views of the Wiwaxy Peaks (3,703 m), Cluster Peaks (2,706 m), and Mount Huber (3,358 m) to your left (north); Mount Lefroy (3,436 m), Glacier Peak (3,294 m).
Hiking Yoho, Kootenay, Glacier, and Mt. Revelstoke National Parks

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Hiking Yoho, Kootenay, Glacier, and Mt. Revelstoke National Parks

by Michelle Gurney & Kathy Howe (Falcon Guides)

A moderate, rocky climb from Lake O’Hara past Yukness Lake, Lake Victoria, and Lefroy Lake before meeting Lake Oesa. Stunning scenery. Like many of the other trails in the Lake O’Hara area, you won’t be disappointed by mediocre scenery. If you delight in visiting alpine lakes, you’ll really enjoy this trip.

Like many of the other trails in the Lake O’Hara area, you won’t be disappointed by mediocre scenery. If you delight in visiting alpine lakes, you’ll really enjoy this trip. Start the trail at Sargent’s Point directly across the fire road (east) of the Le Relais day-use shelter. From here you’ll also have fabulous views of the Wiwaxy Peaks (3,703 m), Cluster Peaks (2,706 m), and Mount Huber (3,358 m) to your left (north); Mount Lefroy (3,436 m), Glacier Peak (3,294 m).

©  Michelle Gurney & Kathy Howe/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Golden
Distance: 4.4
Elevation Gain: 978 feet
Trail Type: Loop/Lollipop
Skill Level: Easy
Duration: 3 to 4 hours
Season: Best mid-June to mid-September
Trailhead Elevation: 6,677 feet
Top Elevation: 7,415 feet
Local Contacts: Yoho National Park
Local Maps: Lake Louise & Yoho (GemTrek Publishing); Lake Louise, 82 N/8
Driving Directions: Directions to Lake Oesa

Recent Trail Reviews

8/8/2007
0

Don't be put off by the effort of getting to Lake O'Hara...we had no luck getting shuttle bus reservations by phone, but when we stopped off at the trailhead on a day with scattered showers, there were plenty of spaces open for our party of three. Parks Canada is kind enough to take credit cards, granting you entree to the other-worldly experience of Lake O'Hara. We hiked about halfway to Lake Oesa, to Victoria Falls, before the pelting rain forced us to back off from climbing an extremely slick stone steps we didn't think our 6-year-old could handle. In any case, we were thankful for the genius of Lawrence Grassi for carving out a spectacular trail amidst a boulder field. We watched a lone mountain goat graze on the cliff overhanding Lake Victoria as we descended back to Lake O'Hara. Completing the lake circuit trail allowed us to view this jewel of the Canadian Rockies from every angle. Even in the pouring rain, this is a once-in-a-lifetime experience every hiker should consider putting on their life list.


9/4/2005
0

The information about the Lake O'Hara trail was alright, but the info on how to get there was better. Due to the daily restriction of persons being able to get into Lake O'Hara, your instructions were good. We did take the hike around the lake trail, but found the loop hike to Opabin Lake form Lake O;Hara, by way of Mary Lake, was a wonderful experience.(We obtained a trail map of the hike to Opabin Lake when we got to Lake O'Hara.) We want to go back and do some other hikes around the area. We did hit a nice driving snow storm at our arrival at Opabin Lake, but it cleared and we were treated with wonderful views.



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Activity Feed

May 2018