Deas Island

Delta, British Columbia

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Although Deas Island is now linked by a causeway to the mainland, it remains an island at heart. The main channel of the Fraser River sweeps along its western shore, while the sheltered water of the slough lies on the eastern side. True to its island nature, Deas is often windy, and nature walkers should dress accordingly. The seasons transform this river environment. A winter walk offers a primordial scene—an apparently lifeless swamp, a ghostly sun shining through river fog, muddy or frozen trails. But among the skeletal bushes, towhees, juncos and chickadees will be scratching out their living. Come again in spring, when the island hums with bird and insect life, the leaves are yellow green and wildflowers fringe the marsh. Some other attractions of this lively little regional park are picnic areas, a group campground and a boat dock. Three historic buildings have been brought to the park and restored for use. Highlights: River, slough, tidal marsh, meadows, dunes; historic buildings; Scotch broom, horsetails, aquatic plants; eagles’ nest, songbirds, diving birds, raptors; seals. Terrain: Flat. Dyke-top and woodland trails, sandy paths.

Deas Island Professional Review and Guide

"Although Deas Island is now linked by a causeway to the mainland, it remains an island at heart. The main channel of the Fraser River sweeps along its western shore, while the sheltered water of the slough lies on the eastern side. True to its island nature, Deas is often windy, and nature walkers should dress accordingly. The seasons transform this river environment. A winter walk offers a primordial scene—an apparently lifeless swamp, a ghostly sun shining through river fog, muddy or frozen trails. But among the skeletal bushes, towhees, juncos and chickadees will be scratching out their living. Come again in spring, when the island hums with bird and insect life, the leaves are yellow green and wildflowers fringe the marsh.

Some other attractions of this lively little regional park are picnic areas, a group campground and a boat dock. Three historic buildings have been brought to the park and restored for use. Highlights: River, slough, tidal marsh, meadows, dunes; historic buildings; Scotch broom, horsetails, aquatic plants; eagles’ nest, songbirds, diving birds, raptors; seals. Terrain: Flat. Dyke-top and woodland trails, sandy paths."

Activity Type: Walking
Nearby City: Delta
Distance: 2.5
Trail Type: Loop/Lollipop
Season: All year
Local Contacts: Deas Island Regional Park
Driving Directions: Directions to Deas Island

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May 2018