How to Stand Up on Water Skis

How to Stand Up on Water Skis
Water skiing is a great sport that can lead to hours of fun with your friends and family. Once you learn the basics of standing up on skis, you can spend an entire day out on the boat, taking turns in the water. Remember, this sport can be challenging, especially to the novice skier, so don't get frustrated. When in doubt, take a break and spend some time relaxing on the boat.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Challenging

Things You’ll Need:
  • Personal flotation device Water skis Towrope Boat
  • Personal flotation device
  • Water skis
  • Towrope
  • Boat
Step 1
Put on your personal flotation device. Personal floatation devices (PFDs) are basically foam vests that keep you afloat in the water. They may have zip closures, buckles, or pull over your head. Regardless of type, you should always have your PFD on and fitted properly.
Step 2
Get in the water, and take your skis with you. When you can no longer touch the bottom, you are in deep enough water to put on your skis. Lie back on your PFD, and bring your knees to your chest. Rotate yourself to a seated position, and slide each foot in to the rubber foot casings on each ski.
Step 3
At this point, your head and torso should be vertical in the water. Knees should be at your chest, and skis should be mostly perpendicular to the water. Grab the handle of the towrope, and place the line between your skis. The boat will slowly pull the slack out of the rope.
Step 4
As the boat accelerates, push hard against your skis with your feet. This will keep you from being pulled over the skis instead of up on them. The resistance of your body against the boards lets the boat do the work of getting the skis to the surface. Once the skis are level, you should be able to slowly stand up.

Tips & Warnings

 
Putting on the second ski can be challenging because the weight of the first ski on your other leg can cause you to tip over. Try to keep the part of the ski from your foot forward above the water to help you maintain an upright position. Keep your arms almost straight with just a slight bend in the elbows. Never pull your hands all the way in to your chest, as this creates slack in the towrope, which can be jarring. Keep your knees bent. Proper water skiing position should have your weight over the tails of the skis, almost as though you are sitting in a tall chair.
 
Putting on the second ski can be challenging because the weight of the first ski on your other leg can cause you to tip over. Try to keep the part of the ski from your foot forward above the water to help you maintain an upright position.
 
Keep your arms almost straight with just a slight bend in the elbows. Never pull your hands all the way in to your chest, as this creates slack in the towrope, which can be jarring.
 
Keep your knees bent. Proper water skiing position should have your weight over the tails of the skis, almost as though you are sitting in a tall chair.
 
Before attempting to water ski, you should be very comfortable in the water. Only those with at least average swimming ability should attempt this sport. Always wear your PFD. This is an extreme sport that requires taking safety precautions. If you lose your balance or don't get up, let go of the towrope. You can't "recover" from a fall on water skis; you need to let go, get set up and try again.
 
Before attempting to water ski, you should be very comfortable in the water. Only those with at least average swimming ability should attempt this sport.
 
Always wear your PFD. This is an extreme sport that requires taking safety precautions.
 
If you lose your balance or don't get up, let go of the towrope. You can't "recover" from a fall on water skis; you need to let go, get set up and try again.

Article Written By Emily Crespin

Emily Crespin manages logistics for a wilderness education program in the Colorado Rockies. She holds a Bachelor's degree in biology and a Master's in communications and public relations. Crespin has been a freelance writer and technical editor since 2008.